Never Enough Books

I love books. I love reading.
They make me dream, spur my creativity, travel with my imagination - or give inputs for actual travels.

Books have been part of my life since I was born. The first adult book I've read by myself was 'The Tigers of Mompracem', from Italian writer Emilio Salgari. I will never forget it. The protagonist, Sandokan, is a pirate-hero, gentleman, adventurous, with solid moral principles but a rebellious heart.
What a better way to start my independent reading life than this?

My brother has a list of all the books he has ever read. that would have been a good idea, I would have done it too, thinking about it now.
But, I read a lot nevertheless.

I currently just finished By Night Under the Stone Bridge (1952 in German) by writer Leo Perutz.
The book is a collection of stories, set in Prague in the 16th century. They are bound together by common characters, active or just mentioned in the different stories, but also by both magical and actual historic events, also either just mentioned or actively happening.
The book, a suggestion from my brother David, who reads even more than me, became one of my favorite and I discovered the theme of the historic Mitteleuropa.

I am not catching up with the last few National Geographic issues (which I had in the US and finally got here with girlfriend Stephanie), but I am always reading a book and a magazine at the same time, therefore I am going to start another book tonight or tomorrow night.

What book have you last read? What books do you suggest me?

Life Meeting Point

My return to Nottingham has been busy, in a good way.
After spending the holidays at home in Italy, I had few days at home in Nottingham; then my mother and my brother came to visit; then I had few days by myself; then my girlfriend Stephanie arrived (at last!).
On top of that, I had important deadlines at work.
Also, of course, I went back training and this week I am basically back to full regimen.
The first two weeks back to England have been great!

A great moment of the time I had with my family has been the visit to Newstead Abbey.
Newstead Abbey (my museum entry photo here) was a former priory which had been destroyed by Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries. part of it had been saved because it was sold to a private person.
That private person was an ancestor of famed Lord Byron.

Lord Byron (George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron) was a poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement.
He couldn't live, let alone restore, the huge building, but perhaps that is what kept the interest of it, with its run down parts.
The building (the former priory) is the standing building that is left, while the actual church has only the front facade left.
The building is interesting under any aspect, from some faulted ceilings, to a long corridor, to the pretty artisan details, such as the doors' handles, which are all carved out of wood.
The big estate is very interesting too, with secret corners, a Japanese garden, three vast water bodies, and more. It is fascinating and unique, diverse and charming - like what they said its owner was.
Lord Byron was, for what they say, beautiful, eccentric, intelligent and literate.

At Newstead Abbey, literature, history, architecture, religion, nature all meet in one place, in an organic, elegant, magical way.

I want to visit more places like this, more places that have more than one deep layer to it, and have interesting stories that you can find only in that very place.